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legendary huge lizard-like monster; bad-tempered woman; violent person


Dragon [from Greek drakon, serpent, the watchful] Known to scholarship as a mythical monster, a huge lizard, winged, scaly, fire-breathing, doubtless originating in the memory of an actual prehistoric animal. Dragon is often synonymous with serpent. The dragon and serpent, whether high or low, are types of various events in cosmic or world history, or of various terrestrial or human qualities, for either one can at different times signify spiritual immortality, wisdom, reimbodiment, or regeneration. In the triad of sun, moon, and serpent or cross, it denotes the manifested Logos, and hence is often said to be seven-headed. As such it is in conflict with the sun, and sometimes with the moon; but this conflict is merely the duality of contrary forces essential to cosmic stability. The dragon itself is often dual, and it may be paired with the serpent, as with Agathodaimon and Kakodaimon, the good and evil serpents, seen in the caduceus. Again the dragon is two-poled as having a head and a tail, Rahu and Ketu in India, commonly described as being the moon's north and south nodes, the moon thus being a triple symbol in which a unity conflicts with a duality.
A universal myth is that of the sun god fighting the dragon and eventually worsting it, which represents the descent of spirit into matter and the eventual sublimation of matter by spirit in the ascending arc of evolution. There are Bel (and later Merodach) and the dragon Tiamat in Babylonia and with the Hebrews; Fafnir in Scandinavia; Chozzar with the Peratae Gnostics; among the Greeks Python conquered by Apollo and the two serpents killed by Hercules at his birth;
to be continue "Dragon2 "

dragon
\drag"on\ (?), n. [f. dragon, l. draco, fr. gr. &?;, prob. fr. &?;, &?;, to look (akin to skr. dar&?; to see), and so called from its terrible eyes. cf. drake a dragon, dragoon.]
1. (myth.) a fabulous animal, generally represented as a monstrous winged serpent or lizard, with a crested head and enormous claws, and regarded as very powerful and ferocious. the dragons which appear in early paintings and sculptures are invariably representations of a winged crocodile.
note: in scripture the term dragon refers to any great monster, whether of the land or sea, usually to some kind of serpent or reptile, sometimes to land serpents of a powerful and deadly kind. it is also applied metaphorically to satan. thou breakest the heads of the dragons in the waters. -- ps. lxxiv. 13. thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder; the young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample under feet. -- ps. xci. 13. he laid hold on the dragon, that old serpent, which is the devil and satan, and bound him a thousand years. xx. 2.
2. a fierce, violent person, esp. a woman.
3. (astron.) a constellation of the northern hemisphere figured as a dragon; draco.
4. a luminous exhalation from marshy grounds, seeming to move through the air as a winged serpent.
5. (mil. antiq.) a short musket hooked to a swivel attached to a soldier's belt; -- so called from a representation of a dragon's head at the muzzle.
6. (zo?l.) a small arboreal lizard of the genus draco, of several species, found in the east indies and southern asia. five or six of the hind ribs, on each side, are prolonged and covered with weblike skin, forming a sort of wing. these prolongations aid them in making long leaps from tree to tree. called also flying lizard.
7. (zo?l.) a variety of carrier pigeon.
8. (her.) a fabulous winged creature, sometimes borne as a charge in a coat of arms.
note: dragon is often used adjectively, or in combination, in the sense of relating to, resembling, or characteristic of, a dragon.
dragon
arum (bot.), the name of several species of aris?ma, a genus of plants having a spathe and spadix. see dragon root(below).
dragon
fish (zo?l.), the dragonet.
dragon
fly (zo?l.), any insect of the family libellulid?. they have finely formed, large and strongly reticulated wings, a large head with enormous eyes, and a long body; -- called also mosquito hawks. their larv? are aquatic and insectivorous.
dragon
root (bot.), an american aroid plant (aris?ma dracontium); green dragon.

  similar words(18) 

 dragon fly etc 
 dragon fly 
 dragon fish 
 dragon shell 
 dragon root 
 vine dragon 
 dragon lizard 
 dragon water 
 dragon tree 
 green dragon 
 flying dragon 
 dragon arum 
 dragon book 
 water dragon 
 gum dragon 
 river dragon 
 rouge dragon 
 komodo dragon 


The translators of the Authorized Version, apparently following the Vulgate, have rendered by the same word "dragon" the two Hebrew words tan and tannin, which appear to be quite distinct in meaning.
→ The former is used, always in the plural, in (Job 30:29; Psalms 44:19; Isaiah 34:13; 43:20; Jeremiah 9:11) It is always applied to some creatures inhabiting the desert, and we should conclude from this that it refers rather to some wild beast than to a serpent. The syriac renders it by a word which, according to Pococke, means a "jackal."
→ The word tannin seems to refer to any great monster, whether of the land or the sea, being indeed more usually applied to some kind of serpent or reptile, but not exclusively restricted to that sense. (Exodus 7:9,10,12; 32:33; Psalms 91:13) In the New Testament it is found only in the Apocalypse, (Revelation 12:3,4,7,9,16,17) etc., as applied metaphorically to "the old serpent, called the devil, and Satan."
  

A dragon is a legendary creature, typically with serpentine or reptilian traits, that features in the myths of many cultures. There are two distinct cultural traditions of dragons: the European dragon, derived from European folk traditions and ultimately related to Greek and Middle Eastern mythologies, and the Chinese dragon, with counterparts in Japan (namely the Japanese dragon), Korea and other East Asian countries.

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Noun
1. a faint constellation twisting around the north celestial pole and lying between Ursa Major and Cepheus
(synonym) Draco
(hypernym) constellation
Noun
1. a creature of Teutonic mythology; usually represented as breathing fire and having a reptilian body and sometimes wings
(synonym) firedrake
(hypernym) mythical monster, mythical creature
(hyponym) Fafnir
2. a fiercely vigilant and unpleasant woman
(synonym) tartar
(hypernym) unpleasant woman, disagreeable woman
3. any of several small tropical Asian lizards capable of gliding by spreading winglike membranes on each side of the body
(synonym) flying dragon, flying lizard
(hypernym) agamid, agamid lizard
(member-holonym) Draco, genus Draco


To dream of a dragon, denotes that you allow yourself to be governed by your passions, and that you are likely to place yourself in the power of your enemies through those outbursts of sardonic tendencies. You should be warned by this dream to cultivate self-control.

See Devil.
  

draic

n. [MIT] A program similar to a daemon, except that it is not invoked at all, but is instead used by the system to perform various secondary tasks. A typical example would be an accounting program, which keeps track of who is logged in, accumulates load-average statistics, etc. Under ITS, many terminals displayed a list of people logged in, where they were, what they were running, etc., along with some random picture (such as a unicorn, Snoopy, or the Enterprise), which was generated by the `name dragon'. Usage: rare outside MIT -- under Unix and most other OSes this would be called a `background demon' or daemon. The best-known Unix example of a dragon is cron(1). At SAIL, they called this sort of thing a `phantom'.

Dragon = n. leader in war Draig = n. dragon; lightning

Dragon House 25 YO, De Luxe Blended Scotch Whisky
By: Douglas Manufacturing Co. (Glasgow, Scotland)

a wild ass; a dragon
   wild ass; heap of empire; dragon
  

DRAGON PHARMACEUTICALS
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(n.)
A variety of carrier pigeon.
   (n.)
A small arboreal lizard of the genus Draco, of several species, found in the East Indies and Southern Asia. Five or six of the hind ribs, on each side, are prolonged and covered with weblike skin, forming a sort of wing. These prolongations aid them in making long leaps from tree to tree. Called also flying lizard.
   (n.)
A short musket hooked to a swivel attached to a soldier's belt; -- so called from a representation of a dragon's head at the muzzle.
   (n.)
A luminous exhalation from marshy grounds, seeming to move through the air as a winged serpent.
   (n.)
A fierce, violent person, esp. a woman.
   (n.)
A fabulous winged creature, sometimes borne as a charge in a coat of arms.
   (n.)
A fabulous animal, generally represented as a monstrous winged serpent or lizard, with a crested head and enormous claws, and regarded as very powerful and ferocious.
   (n.)
A constellation of the northern hemisphere figured as a dragon; Draco.
  

A type of a dragon. A breed of wild dragon found in Britain. One of the most magical substances known to wizards. A type of a dragon. The translation of the Hogwarts motto, translated from: "Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus". A Norwegian Ridgeback dragon which Hagrid hatches after he wins an egg at a pub. A rare type of dragon, like Norbert. A type of a dragon. A type of a dragon.

The Worms of Morgoth.
Mighty reptilian creatures who ranked among the most feared of the servants of the Dark Lord. Of the origins of dragons, no tale tells; the first of them to be seen was Glaurung, Father of Dragons, who first issued from Angband in the middle of the First Age. After Glaurung came many others to strike fear into Elves and Men for the next three ages; among them were Ancalagon the first winged dragon, Scatha who dwelt in the cold northern wastes, and Smaug, last of the great dragons.
Dragons have powers of intelligence and speech, and many are also able to cast the dragon-spell, a bewildering confusion that effects any who gaze into the eye of the creature.
The dragons were not destroyed at the end of the Third Age; some are said to have survived to our own time, but the great worms and drakes of the Elder Days are no more.

inhale the smoke of heated heroin person employed to put out burning oil wellheads urinate

n. The immensely powerful beings that once ruled Elanthia, the beings worshipped as gods today were but servants to the Great Drakes. They are said to have been immensely strong in mana, extremely intelligent and physically terrible. They also kept the lesser races subjugated, not allowing them to form societies at all, and only allowing them to live at the request of their favored servants, the arkati. All Drakes are believed to have been killed or driven insane as a result of the Ur-Daemon War.
Also see: The Arkati, Ur-Daemon, The Ur-Daemon War

(1.) Heb. tannim, plural of tan. The name of some unknown creature inhabiting desert places and ruins (Job 30:29; Ps. 44:19; Isa. 13:22; 34:13; 43:20; Jer. 10:22; Micah 1:8; Mal. 1:3); probably, as translated in the Revised Version, the jackal (q.v.). (2.) Heb. tannin. Some great sea monster (Jer. 51:34). In Isa. 51:9 it may denote the crocodile. In Gen. 1:21 (Heb. plural tanninim) the Authorized Version renders "whales," and the Revised Version "sea monsters." It is rendered "serpent" in Ex. 7:9. It is used figuratively in Ps. 74:13; Ezek. 29:3. In the New Testament the word "dragon" is found only in Rev. 12:3, 4, 7, 9, 16, 17, etc., and is there used metaphorically of "Satan." (See WHALE.)

At the time of it's first flight it was called the Dragon Six as it was powered by two Gipsy Six engines. Nearly 200 were sold Worldwide before the outbreak of WWII. A military version was built and designated the DH89M.

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