Translation of Moses in English

Moses Translation

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Moses in English
Hebrew Prophet who lead the Israelites out of Egypt into the Wilderness on their way to the promised Land, author of the first five books of the Bible; male first name; family name; Anna Mary Robertson "Grandma" Moses (1860-1961), United States artist gosh!, golly!, wow Holy Moses! (exclamation of surprise, amazement or puzzlement)

Dictionary source: Babylon English-English
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Moses in Greek
μωυσής

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Greek Dictionary
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Moses in Chinese (s)
摩西; 放高利贷者; 领导者

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Chinese (S) Dictionary
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Moses in Chinese (t)
摩西; 放高利貸者; 領導者

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Chinese (T) Dictionary
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Moses in Arabic
موسى, رسول بني اسرائيل الذي قادهم خارجًا من مصر إلى الصحراء ليشقوا طريقهم إلى أرض الميعاد , كاتب الكتب الخمس الأولى من الكتاب المقدس; اسم أول لرجل; اسم عائلة ; آنا ماري روبرتسون "جراندما" موسيز (1860-1961), فنانة أمريكية

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Arabic Dictionary
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Moses in Spanish
Moisés

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Spanish Dictionary
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Moses in Russian
Моисей

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Russian Dictionary
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Moses in Dutch
Mozes

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Dutch Dictionary
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Moses in Portuguese
Moisés, profeta Hebreu que libertou os israelitas do Egito e os levou para a terra prometida, autor dos cinco livros da Bíblia; nome próprio masculino; sobrenome; Anna Mary Robertson "Grandma" Moses (1860-1961), artista norte-americana

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Portuguese Dictionary
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Moses in Turkish
Musa

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Turkish Dictionary
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Moses in Italian
(bibl.) Mosè, profeta ebreo che condusse gli israeliti fuori dell'Egitto nel deserto sulla strada verso la Terra Promessa, autore dei primi cinque libri della Bibbia; nome proprio; cognome; Anna Mary Robertson "Grandma" Moses (1860-1961), artista statunitense

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Italian Dictionary
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Moses in French
Moïse, prophéte hébreu qui fit sortir les Hébreux de l'Egypte pour les amener en terre promise; recu la loi écrite sur le mont Sinaï de la main de l'Eternel Bonté divine!, ça alors!

Dictionary source: Babylon English-French Dictionary
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Moses in German
Moses, hebräischer Prophet der die Israeliten aus Ägypten durch die Wste nach Kanaan führte (Altes Testament); Autor der ersten fünf Bücher der der Bibel; männlicher Vorname; Nachname; Anna Maray Robertson "Grandma" Moses (1860-1961), amerikanische Künstlerin

Dictionary source: Babylon English-German Dictionary
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Moses in Japanese
モーセ, ユダヤ人預言者でユダヤ人たちをエジプトから約束の地へ向けて荒野を導いた人物, 最初の5冊の聖書の著者(聖書); 男子名; 姓; アンナ マリー ロバートソン ”グランドマ” モーゼス(1860-1961), アメリカの芸術家

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Japanese Dictionary
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Moses in Hebrew
משה רבנו, שמו של מנהיג ישראל במדבר (בתנ"ך); שם פרטי לזכר; שם משפחה; אן מרי רוברטסון "גרנדמה" מוזס (1860-1961), ציירת אמריקאית אל אלוהים!, אלוהים! (קריאת תדהמה ולהבעת תימהון)

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Hebrew Dictionary
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Moses in Korean
모세, 유대 민족을 이스라엘 땅으로 인도한 유대 예언자 (성서); 안나메리 로버트슨, "할머니" 모세 (1860-1961), 미국의 예술가

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Korean Dictionary
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Moses in Swedish
Moses

Dictionary source: Babylon English-Swedish Dictionary
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Moses in English
moses
\mo"ses\ (?), n. a large flatboat, used in the west indies for taking freight from shore to ship.

  similar words(4) 

 moses maimonides 
 book of the law of moses 
 rabbi moses ben maimon 
 law of moses 

Dictionary source: hEnglish - advanced version
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(Heb. Mosheh, "drawn," i.e. from the water; in the Coptic it means "saved from the water"), the legislator of the Jewish people, and in a certain sense the founder of the Jewish religion. The immediate pedigree of Moses is as follows: Levi was the father of: Gershon- Kohath- Merari Kohath was the father of: Amram = Jochebed Amram = Jochebed was the father of: Hur = Miriam- Aaron = Elisheba- Moses = Zipporah Aaron = Elisheba was the father of: Nadab- Abihu- Eleazar- Ithamar Eleazar was the father of: Phineas Moses = Zipporah was the father of: Gershom- Eliezer Gershom was the father of: Jonathan The history of Moses naturally divides itself into three periods of 40 years each. Moses was born at Goshen, In Egypt, B.C. 1571. The story of his birth is thoroughly Egyptian in its scene. His mother made extraordinary efforts for his preservation from the general destruction of the male children of Israel. For three months the child was concealed in the house. Then his mother placed him in a small boat or basket of papyrus, closed against the water by bitumen. This was placed among the aquatic vegetation by the side of one of the canals of the Nile. The sister lingered to watch her brother's fate. The Egyptian princess, who, tradition says, was a childless wife, came down to bathe in the sacred river. Her attendant slaves followed her. She saw the basket in the flags, and despatched divers, who brought it. It was opened, and the cry of the child moved the princess to compassion. She determined to rear it as her own. The sister was at hand to recommend a Hebrew nurse, the child's own mother. here was the first part of Moses' training,-a training at home in the true religion, in faith in God, in the promises to his nation, in the life of a saint,-a training which he never forgot, even amid the splendors and gilded sin of Pharaoh's court. The child was adopted by the princess. From this time for many years Moses must be considered as an Egyptian. In the Pentateuch this period is a blank, but in the New Testament he is represented as "learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians," and as "mighty in words and deeds." (Acts 7:22) this was the second part of Moses' training. The second period of Moses' life began when he was forty years old. Seeing the sufferings of his people, Moses determined to go to them as their helper, and made his great life-choice, "choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season; esteeming the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures in Egypt." (Hebrews 11:25,26) Seeing an Israelite suffering the bastinado from an Egyptian, and thinking that they were alone, he slew the Egyptian, and buried the corpse in the sand. But the people soon showed themselves unfitted as yet to obtain their freedom, nor was Moses yet fitted to be their leader. He was compelled to leave Egypt when the slaying of the Egyptian became known, and he fled to the land of Midian, in the southern and southeastern part of the Sinai peninsula. There was a famous well ("the well,") (Exodus 2:15) surrounded by tanks for the watering of the flocks of the Bedouin herdsmen. By this well the fugitive seated himself and watched the gathering of the sheep. There were the Arabian shepherds, and there were also seven maidens, whom the shepherds rudely drove away from the water. The chivalrous spirit which had already broken forth in behalf of his oppressed countrymen broke forth again in behalf of the distressed maidens. They returned unusually soon to their father, Jethro, and told him of their adventure. Moses, who up to this time had been "an Egyptian," (Exodus 2:19) now became for a time an Arabian. He married Zipporah, daughter of his host, to whom he also became the slave and shepherd. (Exodus 2:21; 3:1) Here for forty years Moses communed with God and with nature, escaping from the false ideas taught him in Egypt, and sifting out the truths that were there. This was the third process of his training for his work; and from this training he learned infinitely more than from Egypt. Stanely well says, after enumerating what the Israelites derived from Egypt, that the contrast was always greater than the likeness. This process was completed when God met him on Horeb, appearing in a burning bush, and, communicating with him, appointed him to be the leader and deliverer of his people. Now begins the third period of forty years in Moses' life. He meets Aaron, his next younger brother, whom God permitted to be the spokesman, and together they return to Goshen in Egypt. From this time the history of Moses is the history of Israel for the next forty years. Aaron spoke and acted for Moses, and was the permanent inheritor of the sacred staff of power. But Moses was the inspiring soul behind. he is incontestably the chief personage of the history, in a sense in which no one else is described before or since. He was led into a closer communion with the invisible world than was vouchsafed to any other in the Old Testament. There are two main characters in which he appears-as a leader and as a prophet. (1) As a leader, his life divides itself into the three epochs-the march to Sinai; the march from Sinai to Kadesh; and the conquest of the transjordanic kingdoms. On approaching Palestine the office of the leader becomes blended with that of the general or the conqueror. By Moses the spies were sent to explore the country. Against his advice took place the first disastrous battle at hormah. To his guidance is ascribed the circuitous route by which the nation approached Palestine from the east, and to his generalship the two successful campaigns in which Sihon and Og were defeated. The narrative is told so briefly that we are in danger of forgetting that at this last stage of his life Moses must have been as much a conqueror and victorious soldier as was Joshua. (2) His character as a prophet is, from the nature of the case, more distinctly brought out. He is the first as he is the greatest example of a prophet in the Old Testament. His brother and sister were both endowed with prophetic gifts. The seventy elders, and Eldad and Medad also, all "prophesied." (Numbers 11:25-27) But Moses rose high above all these. With him the divine revelations were made "mouth to mouth." (Numbers 12:8) Of the special modes of this more direct communication, four great examples are given, corresponding to four critical epochs in his historical career. (a) The appearance of the divine presence in the flaming acacia tree. (Exodus 3:2-6) (b) In the giving of the law from Mount Sinai, the outward form of the revelation was a thick darkness as of a thunder-cloud, out of which proceeded a voice. (Exodus 19:19; 20:21) on two occasions he is described as having penetrated within the darkness. (Exodus 24:18; 34:28) (c) It was nearly at the close of these communications in the mountains of Sinai that an especial revelation of God was made to him personally. (Exodus 33:21,22; 34:5,6,7) God passed before him. (d) The fourth mode of divine manifestation was that which is described as beginning at this juncture, and which was maintained with more or less continuity through the rest of his career. (Exodus 33:7) It was the communication with God in the tabernacle from out the pillar of cloud and fire. There is another form of Moses' prophetic gift, viz., the poetical form of composition which characterizes the Jewish prophecy generally. These poetical utterances are-
→ "The song which Moses and the children of Israel sung" (after the passage of the Red Sea). (Exodus 15:1-19)
→ A fragment of the war-song against Amalek. (Exodus 17:16)
→ A fragment of lyrical burst of indignation. (Exodus 32:18)
→ The fragments of war-songs, probably from either him or his immediate prophetic followers, in (Numbers 21:14,15,27-30) preserved in the "book of the wars of Jehovah," (Numbers 21:14) and the address to the well. ch. (Numbers 21:14) and the address to the well. ch. (Numbers 21:16,17,18)
→ The song of Moses, (32:1-43) setting forth the greatness and the failings of Israel.
→ The blessing of Moses on the tribes, (33:1-29)
→ The 90th Psalm, "A prayer of Moses, the man of God." The title, like all the titles of the psalms, is of doubtful authority, and the psalm has often been referred to a later author. Character .-The prophetic office of Moses can only be fully considered in connection with his whole character and appearance. (Hosea 12:13) He was in a sense peculiar to himself the founder and representative of his people; and in accordance with this complete identification of himself with his nation is the only strong personal trait which we are able to gather from his history. (Numbers 12:3) The word "meek" is hardly an adequate reading of the Hebrew term, which should be rather "much enduring." It represents what we should now designate by the word "disinterested." All that is told of him indicates a withdrawal of himself, a preference of the cause of his nation to his own interests, which makes him the most complete example of Jewish patriotism. (He was especially a man of prayer and of faith, of wisdom, courage and patience.) In exact conformity with his life is the account of his end. The book of Deuteronomy describes, and is, the long last farewell of the prophet to his people. This takes place on the first day of the eleventh month of the fortieth year of the wanderings, in the plains of Moab. (1:3,5) Moses is described as 120 years of age, but with his sight and his freshness of strength unabated. (34:7) Joshua is appointed his successor. The law is written out and ordered to be deposited in the ark. ch. 31. The song and the blessing of the tribes conclude the farewell. chs. 32,33. And then comes the mysterious close. He is told that he is to see the good land beyond the Jordan, but not to possess it himself. He ascends the mount of Pisgah and stands on Nebo, one of its summits, and surveys the four great masses of Palestine west of the Jordan, so far as it can be discerned from that height. The view has passes into a proverb for all nations. "So Moses the servant of Jehovah died there in the land of Moab, according to the word of Jehovah. And he buried him in a 'ravine' in the land of Moab, 'before' Beth-peor: but no man knoweth of his sepulchre unto this day... And the children of Israel wept for Moses in the plains of Moab thirty days." (34:5,6,8) This is all that is said in the sacred record. (This burial was thus hidden probably- (1) To preserve his grave from idolatrous worship or superstitious reverence; and (2) Because it may be that God did not intend to leave his body to corruption, but to prepare it, as he did the body of Elijah, so that Moses could in his spiritual body meet Christ, together with Elijah, on the mount of transfiguration.) Moses is spoken of as a likeness of Christ; and as this is a point of view which has been almost lost in the Church, compared with the more familiar comparisons of Christ to Adam, David, Joshua, and yet has as firm a basis in fact as any of them, it may be well to draw it out in detail. (1) Moses is, as it would seem, the only character of the Old Testament to whom Christ expressly likens himself: "Moses wrote of me." (John 5:46) It suggests three main points of likeness: (a) Christ was, like Moses, the great prophet of the people-the last, as Moses was the first. (b) Christ, like Moses, is a lawgiver: "Him shall ye hear." (c) Christ, like Moses, was a prophet out of the midst of the nation, "from their brethren." As Moses was the entire representative of his people, feeling for them more than for himself, absorbed in their interests, hopes and fears, so, with reverence be it said, was Christ. (2) In (Hebrews 3:1-19; 12:24-29; Acts 7:37) Christ is described, though more obscurely, as the Moses of the new dispensation-as the apostle or messenger or mediator of God to the people-as the controller and leader of the flock or household of God. (3) The details of their lives are sometimes, though not often, compared. (Acts 7:24-28; 35) In (Jude 1:9) is an allusion to an altercation between Michael and Satan over the body of Moses. It probably refers to a lost apocryphal book, mentioned by Origen, called the "Ascension" or "Assumption of Moses." Respecting the books of Moses, see Pentateuch, The.
  

Copyright: Smith's Bible Dictionary (1884) , by William Smith. About Dictionary source: Smith's Bible Dictionary
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Moses (, Modern Tiberian ISO 259-3 ; Moushe; ) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the Qur'an, and Baha'i scripture, a former Egyptian prince and warrior, later turned religious leader, lawgiver, and prophet, to whom the authorship of the Torah is traditionally attributed. Also called Moshe Rabbenu in Hebrew (, Lit. "Moses our Teacher/Rabbi"), he is the most important prophet in Judaism. He is also an important prophet in Christianity and Islam, as well as a number of other faiths.

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Copyright: © This article uses material from Wikipedia® and is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License and under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License Dictionary source: Wikipedia English - The Free Encyclopedia
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Noun
1. (Old Testament) the Hebrew prophet who led the Israelites from Egypt across the Red sea on a journey known as the Exodus; Moses received the Ten Commandments from God on Mount Sinai
(hypernym) prophet
(classification) Old Testament
2. United States painter of colorful and primitive rural scenes (1860-1961)
(synonym) Grandma Moses, Anne Mary Robertson Moses
(hypernym) painter


Dictionary source: WordNet 2.0
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To dream that you see Moses, means personal gain and a connubial alliance which will be a source of sweet congratulation to yourself.
  

Copyright: Ten Thousand Dreams Interpreted, or "What's in a dream": a scientific and practical exposition; By Gustavus Hindman, 1910. For the open domain e-text see: Guttenberg Project Dictionary source: Dream Dictionary
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taken out; drawn forth
  

Copyright: Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (1869) , by Roswell D. Hitchcock. About Dictionary source: Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary
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Massive Open Systems Environment Standard

Dictionary source: 9300+ Computer Acronyms
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(n.)
A large flatboat, used in the West Indies for taking freight from shore to ship.
  

Copyright: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About Dictionary source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
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According to the story in the book of Exodus, Moses was chosen by God, in a face-to-face encounter, to lead the Israelite slaves out of Egypt to the Promised Land, the Land of Canaan. Through him, God brought about plagues on the Egyptians--including the death of all their firstborn children--until they let the Israelites leave. Pharaoh then thought he would bring the Israelites back, but God parted the water of the Reed Sea for the Israelites to escape and then drowned the Egyptian Army. Moses then took the people Israel to Mt. Sinai where they made a Covenant with God. Moses then led the people in the wilderness for 40 years, dying just before they crossed the Jordan River and entered Canaan. Moses Maimonides, also called Moses ben Maimon and as Rambam, lived from 1138-1204. He was an active doer and thinker who served as the court physician to the ruler of Egypt. He was the first to write a codification of talmudic halakhah and was also was extensively learned in Greek philosophy. He composed a philosophical work called The Guide for the Perplexed in which he tried to harmonize Aristotle's thought with the Torah, and showing how, when the two were incompatible, that the Torah was correct. He also developed the concept of the 613 mitzvot.

Dictionary source: Official Judaism Glossary
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an exclamation of surprise exclamation indicating surprise, indignation, etc.


Dictionary source: Australian Slang
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drawn (or Egypt. mesu, "son;" hence Rameses, royal son). On the invitation of Pharaoh (Gen. 45:17-25), Jacob and his sons went down into Egypt. This immigration took place probably about 350 years before the birth of Moses. Some centuries before Joseph, Egypt had been conquered by a pastoral Semitic race from Asia, the Hyksos, who brought into cruel subjection the native Egyptians, who were an African race. Jacob and his retinue were accustomed to a shepherd's life, and on their arrival in Egypt were received with favour by the king, who assigned them the "best of the land", the land of Goshen, to dwell in. The Hyksos or "shepherd" king who thus showed favour to Joseph and his family was in all probability the Pharaoh Apopi (or Apopis). Thus favoured, the Israelites began to "multiply exceedingly" (Gen. 47:27), and extended to the west and south. At length the supremacy of the Hyksos came to an end. The descendants of Jacob were allowed to retain their possession of Goshen undisturbed, but after the death of Joseph their position was not so favourable. The Egyptians began to despise them, and the period of their "affliction" (Gen. 15:13) commenced. They were sorely oppressed. They continued, however, to increase in numbers, and "the land was filled with them" (Ex. 1:7). The native Egyptians regarded them with suspicion, so that they felt all the hardship of a struggle for existence. In process of time "a king [probably Seti I.] arose who knew not Joseph" (Ex. 1:8). (See PHARAOH.) The circumstances of the country were such that this king thought it necessary to weaken his Israelite subjects by oppressing them, and by degrees reducing their number. They were accordingly made public slaves, and were employed in connection with his numerous buildings, especially in the erection of store-cities, temples, and palaces. The children of Israel were made to serve with rigour. Their lives were made bitter with hard bondage, and "all their service, wherein they made them serve, was with rigour" (Ex. 1:13, 14). But this cruel oppression had not the result expected of reducing their number. On the contrary, "the more the Egyptians afflicted them, the more they multiplied and grew" (Ex. 1:12). The king next tried, through a compact secretly made with the guild of midwives, to bring about the destruction of all the Hebrew male children that might be born. But the king's wish was not rigorously enforced; the male children were spared by the midwives, so that "the people multiplied" more than ever. Thus baffled, the king issued a public proclamation calling on the people to put to death all the Hebrew male children by casting them into the river (Ex. 1:22). But neither by this edict was the king's purpose effected. One of the Hebrew households into which this cruel edict of the king brought great alarm was that of Amram, of the family of the Kohathites (Ex. 6:16-20), who with his wife Jochebed and two children, Miriam, a girl of perhaps fifteen years of age, and Aaron, a boy of three years, resided in or near Memphis, the capital city of that time. In this quiet home a male child was born (B.C. 1571). His mother concealed him in the house for three months from the knowledge of the civic authorities. But when the task of concealment became difficult, Jochebed contrived to bring her child under the notice of the daughter of the king by constructing for him an ark of bulrushes, which she laid among the flags which grew on the edge of the river at the spot where the princess was wont to come down and bathe. Her plan was successful. The king's daughter "saw the child; and behold the child wept." The princess (see PHARAOH'S DAUGHTER ¯T0002924 [1]) sent Miriam, who was standing by, to fetch a nurse. She went and brought the mother of the child, to whom the princess said, "Take this child away, and nurse it for me, and I will give thee thy wages." Thus Jochebed's child, whom the princess called "Moses", i.e., "Saved from the water" (Ex. 2:10), w is the whole body of the Mosaic legislation (1 Kings 2:3; 2 Kings 23:25; Ezra 3:2). It is called by way of eminence simply "the Law" (Heb. Torah, Deut. 1:5; 4:8, 44; 17:18, 19; 27:3, 8). As a written code it is called the "book of the law of Moses" (2 Kings 14:6; Isa. 8:20), the "book of the law of God" (Josh. 24:26). The great leading principle of the Mosaic law is that it is essentially theocratic; i.e., it refers at once to the commandment of God as the foundation of all human duty.

Dictionary source: Easton's Bible Dictionary
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Moses in Greek
Μωυσής

Dictionary source: English - Greek Dictionary
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Moses in Esperanto
Moseo

Dictionary source: English Esperanto Dictionary (M.F.)
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Moses in Arabic
موسى

Dictionary source: English Arabic Dictionary
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اسْم : مُوسَى


Dictionary source: Concise English-Arabic Dictionary
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ألاسم

مُوسَى


ethar1@yahoo.com

Dictionary source: English to Arabic Dictionary
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مُوسَى

Dictionary source: English to Arabic Bible Names Dictionary
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Moses in Indonesian
Musa
my child #13

Dictionary source: Mas NDon English Indonesian Dictionary
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Moses in Spanish
Moisés

Dictionary source: English_Spanish by Jaime Aguirre
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= Moisés.
Ex: Like many others, including Demosthenes and Moses, Lloyd lived with a speech impediment.


Dictionary source: English Spanish Dictionary (Granada University, Spain), 7.7
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Moisés

Dictionary source: English-Spanish Online Dictionary
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Moses in Russian
(n) законодатель; творец законов (0) мозес; моисей; мойзес

Copyright: Learn more at ling98.com Dictionary source: English-Russian Lingvistica Dictionary
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моисей

Dictionary source: English-Russian Online Dictionary
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n. библ. Моисей

Dictionary source: English-Russian Dictionary (Mueller24)
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Moses in Dutch
Mozes

Dictionary source: English-Dutch Online Dictionary
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Moses in Portuguese
[teologia] moisés

Dictionary source: English Portuguese Dictionary (Oliveira)
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Moses in Thai
โม-เส็ส,เจ้าของโรงรับจำนำชาติยิว

Dictionary source: English - Thai Dictionary
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Moses in Romanian
Moise

Dictionary source: English Romanian Dictionary (RDE)
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moise

Dictionary source: DERFOC English-Romanian Dictionary
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Moses in Catalan
s Moisès

Dictionary source: English Catalan Dictionary
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Moses in Polish
Mojżesz

Dictionary source: English Polish Dictionary 0.15
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Moses in French
Moses ['mBLzNz]
1n Bible Moïse m;
Moses basket, moïse m.
2int F Old-fashioned Holy Moses!, grand Dieu!

Dictionary source: English French Dictionary (Kelkouli Rédha)
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Moses in Croatian
Mojsije

Dictionary source: English Croatian Dictionary(Igaly)
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Mojsije

Dictionary source: English Croatian Dictionary(Mijic)
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Mojsije

Dictionary source: English Croatian Dictionary
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Moses in Persian
حضرت‌ موسي‌

Dictionary source: Salaty English Persian Dictionary (Text )
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Dictionary source: Salaty English Persian Dictionary (Graphics)
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حضرت موسى
قانون ـ فقه : موسى
 کلمات مرتبط(5)  کلمات مرتبط(moses):



بازگشت به واژه moses


as meekk as moses 
 law of moses 
moses antedates zoroastes 
 the fire books of moses 
the rod of moses 



Dictionary source: English Persian Dictionary (Hojjat Rabiee)
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حضرت‌ موسي‌ بسيار فروتن‌و بردبار،بسيار حليم‌ )pentateuch(احكام‌ دهگانه‌ موسي‌ موسي‌ازحيث‌سال‌تاريخي‌پيش‌اززردتشت‌ بوده‌است‌ عصاي‌ موسي‌

Dictionary source: Farajbeik English Persian Dictionary (v.2)
More: English to Persian translation of Moses
ü¨ُّ –¤®ںas meekk as m.=ô‏َں ¤‘‏¨“ٹ¤‘“¢¤“ ِّ—ّ¤ê ¤‘‏¨“law of m.=ü¨ُّ ù÷‘ًû¢ ô‘îںگ (pentateuch)the rod of m.=ü¨ُّ ü‘¬ن ô‏َں ¤‘‏¨“ٹ¤‘“¢¤“ ِّ—ّ¤ê ¤‘‏¨“ ü¨ُّ ù÷‘ًû¢ ô‘îںگ (pentateuch) –¨گù¢ّ“ –ھ—¢¤¥¥گ©‏•ü،‏¤‘—ٌ‘¨ک‏ں¥گü¨ُّ ü¨ُّ ü‘¬ن

Dictionary source: Farajbeik English Persian Dictionary (v.1)
More: English to Persian translation of Moses